Active Chemical Ingredients In Wormers. Important to read to get it right.

9 posts / 0 new
Last post
Offline
Last seen: 4 hours 3 min ago
Joined: 2009-10-25 20:13
Active Chemical Ingredients In Wormers. Important to read to get it right.

Active Chemical Groups

It is important to understand what the chemicals do if you are to implement a successful worming program. This will ensure that whatever your worming strategy you give a wormer fit for purpose.

Tapeworm

Praziquantal and Pyrantel Embonate

Encysted Redworm

Moxidectin and Benzimidazole (5 days)

Adult Redworm and Roundworms

Ivermectin, Moxidectin, Pyrantel Embonate, Benzimidazole

Lungworm & Bots

Ivermectin and Moxidectin

A detailed table showing the complete range of each chemical is at the bottom of this information page, and a summary of the coverage of each chemical is listed below.

Praziquantel

Praziquantel is a chemical that is only effective against tapeworm, however it has a larger range than pyrantel embonate (Strongid P / Pyratape P/ Exodus/Embotape) and attacks the three specie of tapeworm. It is available on its own in a single syringe (Equitape), combined with the ivermectin chemical (Equimax / Eqvalan Duo) or with the moxidectin chemical (Equest Pramox). When used on its own it should be an additional treatment in a chemical worming program as it has no coverage against any of the roundworms. This is of benefit if using in a strategic program to reduce the resistance of the roundworm to worming chemicals. Only Equimax is licensed for use in pregnant and lactating mares and foals from two weeks of age.

Pyrantal Embonate

Pyrantal can be used as a base wormer in a chemical rotational worming program. When used at double the standard recommended dosing rates it is effective against A.perfoliata tapeworm. It is effective against many adult roundworms.

Benzimidazole

Fenbendazole (Panacur) and Menbendazole (Telmin) have a large coverage range against roundworms, both adult and larvicidal. When Fenbendazole is given over 5 days (Panacur Equine Guard) it is also effective against encysted small redworm larvae. Some horses in the UK have worms that are resistant to the benzimidazole chemicals. These can be identified using worm egg counts. However, the 5-day treatment still works on the larvae of resistant adults, and should be used in Nov to reduce the levels of worms encysting in the winter and emerging in the spring.

Ivermectin

Macrocyclic Lactones has the largest range of impact on worms. Ivermectin affects most adult and larvicidal roundworms and also includes lungworm and bots. It should be the main chemical in worming programs for donkeys and should be in every worming program during the winter months to control bots. It should be given after the first frost, which is when the adult bot fly will be eliminated. If it is given any earlier then the bot fly could re infect the horse.

Ivermectin is extremely dangerous to fish and aquatic life. Treated animals should not have access to ponds, waterways, ditches and surface water.

Dogs and cats can also be adversely affected by the ivermectin and should not have access to spilled paste or used syringes.

Moxidectin

Although moxidectin is from the same chemical groups as ivermectin it has slightly different coverage. The effect of the chemical is longer and it also works on encysted small redworm larvae. It is not licensed for use in foals under four months of age and can cause reactions at only twice the normal dose in foals and three times the normal dose in adults. Each syringe only treats 575kg so for horses over 15.3hh, more than one syringe may be required.

Moxidectin is extremely dangerous to fish and aquatic life. Treated animals should not have access to ponds, waterways, ditches and surface water.

Dogs and cats can also be adversely affected by the moxidectin and should not have access to spilled paste or used syringes.

Detailed Chemical Comparison Table

The table below shows in detail how each chemical is effective against different types of worms and some treat both adult and larvicidal stages.

[attachment=7250]wormers_chem_table.jpg[/attachment]

Offline
Last seen: 6 hours 27 min ago
Joined: 2010-03-30 13:50
Re: Active Chemical Ingredients In Wormers. Import...

Great report KDee, worming is such an important tool in keeping your horses healthy and preventing problems. Although a good worming program is very important, remembering to use a program to prevent resistance. Also, do not give a horse too much, it can be just as bad as too little. Once again, resistance can develop and then you have a major problem.

Keeping your horses free from worms is not only a result of a good worming program. Picking up faeces, resting paddocks, grazing cattle after horses, not over stocking paddocks, etc are all useful tools in preventing a worm burden. Also remember young horses are more prone to worms than an older horse. This is because the body's immune system gets stronger the more the animal is exposed to them. Young foals should be wormed regularly and I do suggest having several egg counts done at least once a year to ensure you are on top of the worms. Stress is another factor that will allow a horse to become overwelmed by worms.

Offline
Last seen: 1 month 3 weeks ago
Joined: 2013-03-11 01:23
Re: Active Chemical Ingredients In Wormers. Import...

That is amazing stuff. I just try and rotate off the 'ectin's' every year or so. I used Ammo for ages and have now swapped onto Excel but as I am not in a position to rotate the paddocks and all my horses make 'stallion piles' and I think I am a bit lax with the picking up department, I will do that worm burden test.

Could you advise me on how much poop do you need, does it have to be fresh and does it have to get to vets within hours? Also, is it a case that as soon as it is out of the horse do the worms, if there are any, immediately migrate into the soil, so you sort of have to grab it straight away?

Offline
Last seen: 6 hours 27 min ago
Joined: 2010-03-30 13:50
Re: Active Chemical Ingredients In Wormers. Import...

You only need a small amount (one ball) and it is best to collect it fresh. Make a note of which horse it was from. If you cannot get it to the vet within a few hours, pop it in the fridge or cold box. As mentioned, several samples will need to be collected over a few dayss the horse might not be shedding worms at the time of collection. Each vet is different on this matter, so chat to him/her and find out how many samples they feel is ideal.

Try to use a non "ectin" drench every three drenches, or you could get a resistance build up. Bad worms in adults is not as common as people believe because the worming pastes are so effective if used correctly. Removing faeces from paddocks is a big step towards fighting worms. I am not 100% sure on when they go underground, but should image the baby lavae would eat the manure first before moving on. I would think picking up faeces several times a week would be fine.

Offline
Last seen: 7 months 1 week ago
Joined: 2009-05-02 17:36
Re: Active Chemical Ingredients In Wormers. Import...

apparently there is a huge problem with red pinworm (?) in our area.
today, a lady bought our last 2 of the cheapest horse wormers we carry ($9ish) she asked if we had any more. i said "no, there has been quite a run on them lately, not sure why" hinting that maybe its coz they are CHEAP! to not sound narky, i said "they do contain an active ingredient that none of our others do"
she said that its coz in our area, horse owners are having a huge problem with red pinworm and that this el cheapo wormer is the best thing for controlling it, the vets are recommending it, and we are the only store in the area stocking it!
when we got it in, i saw the active ingredient and thought, my horse needs worming, ill give it a go. without knowing it, i had done the right thing.
apparently the worms lay their eggs on the horses bum, the horses bum gets itchy so the rub it on things (causing bare bums, which my horse had) the eggs fall to the ground and are eaten by horse.
if any of this is sounding right or wrong, let me know!

Offline
Last seen: 1 month 2 weeks ago
Joined: 2011-03-27 12:33
Re: Active Chemical Ingredients In Wormers. Import...

Thanks for such an informative post, KDee!

Jockelina, as a farmer's daughter, I applaud you ... paddocks full of poop and not a blade of grass drive me mad. I know it's not always possible to rotate paddocks or even have green feed (I've been there), but picking up poop is a must and I've always been very diligent. The worm issue aside, it keeps the flies away and makes riding far more pleasant (I used to agist at a place where people sometimes fed their horses in the round yard, but never cleaned up and it was so annoying having to clean up before a training session, even though it only took five minutes. LOL).

What do you do with all that poop? I'm a very keen gardener and know all too well that the bottom of the pile is full of perfectly rotted manure that's full of earthworms. I grow some of the best vegies and flowers in town!!

Offline
Last seen: 4 hours 3 min ago
Joined: 2009-10-25 20:13
Re: Active Chemical Ingredients In Wormers. Import...

Bumping this one back up again so that people can learn what the active ingredients in the worm pastes they use actually treat :)

Offline
Last seen: 6 months 19 hours ago
Joined: 2009-06-18 09:38
Re: Active Chemical Ingredients In Wormers. Import...

:blush: Thanks KDee :blush:

Offline
Last seen: 1 month 3 weeks ago
Joined: 2013-03-11 01:23
Re: Active Chemical Ingredients In Wormers. Import...

Hi KDee. Since reading your run down I now swap between Equitak Excel which contains Abamectin, Praziquantel and Oxfendazole, it also does bots and Strategy T which contains a synergistic combination of oxfendazole and pyrantel, I use it to get off the mectins occasionally.

My problem is, years ago I remember being told that if you swap all the time your worm's then build up resistance to all the different chemicals, but if you stay with the same one and only outcross say every 5th rotation they wont build up a resistance to the lot. Am now vacillating between the two theories, what are your thoughts or experiences?

jockelina may want to jump in here as well. The more info I/we receive, the better informed my/our decisions will be.

I dont doubt the other members will be grateful for any assistance.

Thanks.